Installation in Focus: City Point, Brooklyn, NY

 

The Hudson Company at City Point

City Point is downtown Brooklyn's ambitious, new, mixed-use urban development led by The Brodsky Organization and Cook + Fox Architects. For the complex's residential lobby, The Hudson Company custom milled Reclaimed Softwood Joists [Original Face], specially sourced from industrial sites in the surrounding area. The wood used by The Hudson Company for this installation is FSC-certified 100% Recycled. 

Reflecting brooklyn now

According to the official City Point website, 'City Point is the largest food, shopping and entertainment destination in Downtown Brooklyn. It includes retail, residential, and office space located along Brooklyn’s busiest retail corridor at the corner of Flatbush and Fulton.'

As The New York Times reports, 

'Once packed with theaters, restaurants and a range of stores, Downtown Brooklyn saw its fortunes turn in the mid-20th century along with much of the rest of the borough. And the area, which contains a crossroads of subway lines and major streets, near the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges, has been the subject of intersecting ideas about revitalization ever since...City Point, a major development in Downtown Brooklyn, is offering touches that seem to cater to Brooklyn’s homespun, forward-thinking spirit: a movie theater that serves beer. A reinvented shopping mall. A food hall for start-up restaurateurs.'

The Hudson Company is proud to be a part of this exciting new development in the heart of Brooklyn. Contact us to learn more about our sustainable, character-rich Reclaimed Softwood Joists [Original Face] and other FSC-certified wood flooring, paneling, and design products.

Artist's rendering. 

Artist's rendering. 

We have to build something that reflects Brooklyn now. We’re not Manhattan. We’re not the suburbs. We’re something different.
— Developer Paul Travis, from The New York Times
Accent wall in the City Point residential lobby, featuring Hudson Company Reclaimed wood.

Accent wall in the City Point residential lobby, featuring Hudson Company Reclaimed wood.

Accent wall detail.

Accent wall detail.

This Just In: Indiana Mill from 1901

Vintage Image of the Noblesville Milling Co. grain storage facility (date unknown).

Vintage Image of the Noblesville Milling Co. grain storage facility (date unknown).

The mill, 2016.

The mill, 2016.

The mill, 2016.

The mill, 2016.

an icon of the American Heartland

This week, The Hudson Company has been on the road - visiting the sites of several historic, decommissioned Midwestern agrarian structures, in search of high-quality, high-character American timber to reclaim. One of the most interesting finds this week has been 'The Model Mill' and grain elevator in Noblesville, Indiana (pictured above and below).

Built in 1901, the mill was an essential part of the economy in Hamilton County and, for over a century, the iconic structure has been both a physical and symbolic icon for Noblesville and the surrounding farming communities. The mill was originally built to hold 350,000 bushels of wheat, but the area's wheat yields were so plentiful that, by 1911, the facility was expanded to hold a capacity of 700,000 bushels. According to David Heighway, of The Hamilton County Business Magazine, the mill was built in a a style of construction called, "cribbing [wherein] boards are [simply] stacked and nailed together." A 1914 article in The Indianapolis Star took note of the Noblesville mill and elevators, remarking that, "These structures tower above the other buildings of the town and are admired by everyone passing through the city.”

700,000 Board Feet of Reclaimed Heart Pine

After changing ownership several times in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, The Model Mill was eventually decommissioned and has sat abandoned for many years. In 2015, local officials decided that the historic mill and grain elevators would finally be taken down. 

Luckily, much of the mill's original construction material has been well-preserved and will be now be diverted from the waste stream and reclaimed by The Hudson Company. From Noblesville, the 700,000 board feet of Reclaimed Heart Pine will be transported to The Hudson Company Mill in Pine Plains, NY were it will be re-milled and added to our growing inventory of reclaimed wood flooring, paneling, beams and joists. 

The end result of this reclamation process will be 700,000 board feet of custom re-milled Reclaimed Heart Pine [New Face, Chalk Finish] flooring, like the flooring milled for and installed at New York's new Whitney Museum of Modern Art (completed in 2015). 

Click here to learn more about (or to schedule a visit to) The Hudson Company's FSC-Certified lumber mill in Pine Plains, New York.

Pristine American Heart Pine, reclaimed from Noblesville grain facility.

Pristine American Heart Pine, reclaimed from Noblesville grain facility.

On the road in the American Heartland.

On the road in the American Heartland.

The Hudson Company in ELLE DECOR Magazine

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Reclaimed Heart Pine Flooring in ELLE DECOR

We are thrilled to share that our very own Reclaimed Heart Pine [Original Face] floors are featured in Samantha Emmerling and Hillary Brown's article 'Toolbox' in the newest issue of ELLE DECOR Magazine (April, 2016), on newsstands now.

Reclaimed Heart Pine [Original Face] Flooring is one of our most popular and versatile reclaimed wood flooring products and has found a place in design installations of all kinds, including two New York retail spaces for outdoor mega-brand Patagonia (see both stores below).

Reclaimed Antique Long Leaf Heart Pine wood is sourced from Hudson River Valley factories and warehouses whose construction dates back to the Industrial Revolution. Reclaimed Longleaf Heart Pine wood was once a predominant standing timber across a large span of the eastern seaboard. For generations, Long Leaf Heart Pine's prevalence and unique properties made it the most widely-utilized timber in American construction.

Today, The Hudson Company is always on the lookout of high-quality, high-character Heart Pine to reclaim, custom mill, and re-introduce to designers and architects for use in their next projects. 

Learn more about the full range of Hudson Company Reclaimed wood floors (including six varieties of Reclaimed Heart Pine) on our Reclaimed Flooring Page. 

The Patagonia Store, Meatpacking District, NYC

The Patagonia Store, Meatpacking District, NYC

Patagonia Surf Shop, New York.

Patagonia Surf Shop, New York.

This Just In: Reclaimed Heart Pine from the Iconic Belleview-Biltmore Hotel

An undated postcard of The Belleview-Biltmore Resort and Spa. The Hotel's original, iconic red roof was later replaced with green roofing.

An undated postcard of The Belleview-Biltmore Resort and Spa. The Hotel's original, iconic red roof was later replaced with green roofing.

Built by railroad magnate Henry Plant in 1897, this photo shows the hotel during it's early years.

Built by railroad magnate Henry Plant in 1897, this photo shows the hotel during it's early years.

Aerial view of the Belleview-Biltmore taken after it was closed in 2009.

Aerial view of the Belleview-Biltmore taken after it was closed in 2009.

Details of The Bellevue-Biltmore Hotel in disrepair.

Details of The Bellevue-Biltmore Hotel in disrepair.

Recent view of hotel's dilapidated exterior.
Abandoned hotel lobby, 

Abandoned hotel lobby, 

Abandoned hotel interior.

Abandoned hotel interior.

 

The Rise and Fall of "The White Queen of The Gulf"

Once known as 'The White Queen of the Gulf,' the historic Belleview-Biltmore Resort and Spa was, for over 100 years, one of Florida's most celebrated vacation destinations - an iconic symbol of the golden age of American entrepreneurship, travel, and optimism. 

Built in 1897 by railroad giant Henry Bradley Plant, the Belleview-Biltmore was a massive feat of resort architecture, crafted in a Queen Anne and Shingle style. Constructed of native Florida pine, the hotel also featured hand-crafted Tiffany Glass. Eager to increase Florida's tourism and railroad use, the Bellevue-Biltmore was, 'often billed as the largest occupied wooden structure in the world.' Mr. Plant even had special rail service to deliver guests directly to the Belleview's front doors (see above, the image second from the top). In 1979, the hotel was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

According to a 2015 profile on the last days of the hotel by The Tampa Bay Times, the Belleview-Biltmore hosted a wide range of impressive celebrities and dignitaries over the past eleven decades, including "Babe Ruth, Joe DiMaggio, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford...Margaret Thatcher and Barack Obama." In April of 1976, Bob Dylan and his band played two concerts inside the hotel's Starlight Ballroom.

But, despite visits by numerous notables, in the decades after WWII, this grand old resort faded significantly - due in large part to the construction of countless newer, beachfront resorts up and down both of Florida's coasts. In recent years, and after a lengthy debate between preservationists, local officials, and developers, it was decided that the majority of the crumbling hotel would be demolished to make way for new condominiums and townhouses.

Luckily, 36,000 square feet of the Belleview-Biltmore Hotel is being saved. A portion of Mr. Plant's original 1897 hotel is being relocated locally, and renovated into a boutique hotel. The 'new Belleview-Biltmore' will feature a restored 21st-century version of the hotel's original lobby, grand living spaces, 33 guest rooms, and ice-cream parlour. You can watch a video of the project's developer Mike Cheezem walking through the vision for this restored portion of the hotel here.

CAREFULLY RECLAIMING 100-YEAR-OLD HEART PINE FLOORING, JOISTS, AND BEAMS - PIECE BY PIECE

Meanwhile, the demolition of the 820,000 square feet portion of the hotel's structure is being done with precision, piece by piece, "taking the time to salvage 118-year-old heart pine floors, stained glass skylights and wrought iron stairway railings."

Currently, The Hudson Company is taking part in the enormous and careful demolition of this historic architectural treasure. Rather than being added to the waste stream, The Hudson Company is redirecting the Biltmore's still valuable and sustainable wood architectural materials to our mill in Pine Plains, NY. Once reclaimed, this inventory of high-character, high-quality, century-old wood will be custom milled into elements for new construction and design projects. 

Below you can see photos of the process of reclaiming tens of thousands of board feet of century-old heart pine floors, paneling, beams, columns, and other wooden elements. 

Stay tuned to www.thehudsonco.com.news for more updates on this reclamation preoject and about Reclaimed Heart Pine.

Click here to learn more about The Hudson Company's Reclamation Process.

 

The Belleview-Biltmore during deconstruction, 2015 -2016.

The Belleview-Biltmore during deconstruction, 2015 -2016.

Beautiful, 100-year-old  'Dade' Heart Pine, reclaimed from The Belleview-Biltmore Hotel, Florida.

Beautiful, 100-year-old  'Dade' Heart Pine, reclaimed from The Belleview-Biltmore Hotel, Florida.

This Just In: Reclaimed White Oak Beams from Western PA Ham Curing Shed

This Just In: Reclaimed, Hand Cut White Oak Beams sourced by The Hudson Company from a Western Pennsylvania ham curing shed.

The above pictures show off a beautiful batch of recently recovered Reclaimed Oak Beams, sourced by The Hudson Company from a Western Pennsylvania ham curing shed. These White Oak 4" x 6" and 3" x 9" beams are imbued with a rich, historic aged patina - and feature some of the nicest colors and textures we have ever seen in reclaimed wooden beams. You will notice in the above detail photos, that the ends of the 3" x 9"s were hand cut with an axe (no chainsaw marks!).

Whoever is lucky enough to snag these beams will have no problem utilizing them into their next design project as accent rafters, mantles, shelves or furniture.

Email info@thehudsonco.com to learn more about these specific White Oak Beams or to get a quote for the whole batch. Or, click here to learn more about The Hudson Company's line of Reclaimed Wood Beams and Joists.
 

 

Inspired By: California Craftswoman Aleksandra Zee

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This week, we are featuring the inspiring work of Oakland based artist and woodworker Aleksandra Zee. Zee's stunning, reclaimed wood mosaics first came to our attention via her impressive Instagram feed, which led us to her growing portfolio of large and small-scale wooden wall hangings.

Trained in the fine arts, Ms. Zee is deeply inspired by the desert landscapes of the American Southwest and by Native American handicrafts and textiles. She has described her work as, 'recreating Navajo blankets out of wood.'

Speaking to Huck Magazine in 2014, Ms. Zee described her passion for working with reclaimed wood materials:

"I believe in working with a material that inspires you. For me, reclaimed wood has a history and I want to add to that history and give it a new life: rustic, worn, warm, and reminiscent. I love that transformation process. First I choose the lumber I am going to use. Then I separate it into colour palettes. Then I lay out a rough pattern, play around with it a bit, and when it’s perfect I nail it down. After the pattern is created I seal the piece and go to town with a sander."

We are excited to see where Ms. Zee's inspiration and passion for reclaimed materials take her in 2016.  

You can learn about Aleksandra Zee and her work at her site. Unless otherwise noted, all photos are from aleksandrazee.com.

 

Aleksandra Zee for the Buchanan Hotel, San Francisco. Photo by  Laure Joliet .

Aleksandra Zee for the Buchanan Hotel, San Francisco. Photo by Laure Joliet.