The Hudson Company + FAIR for Collective Design 2017

For the 2017 Collective Design Fair, The Hudson Company was proud to collaborate with designer Brad Ford and FAIR.

For FAIR's Collective Design installation, we provided a custom milled floor made from unfinished 2 5/8" Reclaimed Oak, New Face. The flooring material was reclaimed by The Hudson Company from a Pennsylvania dairy barn and re-milled at our Pine Plains, NY mill.

About FAIR: In October 2014, Interior Designer Brad Ford organized a modern makers craft fair in upstate New York called Field + Supply. The focus was on modern, elevated craftsmanship showcasing artisans from the Hudson Valley area as well as makers who work in New York City and Brooklyn. FAIR is an extension of that concept and is now a permanent showroom at the New York Design Center.

About Collective Design: Collective Design brings together creative voices from around the world in a lively, essential discourse on modern and contemporary design and art. Based in New York City and active in the arts community throughout the year, Collective Design presents engaging conversations and educational programs to foster dialogue, encourage the exchange of ideas, and build a growing audience for collectible design and art. 

Learn more about Hudson Company Reclaimed Oak, New Face flooring.

The Hudson Company + Brad Ford & FAIR for DIFFA

This month, The Hudson Company was proud to support the  20th annual  DIFFA Dining by Design event, which, 'raises awareness and grants funds to organizations that provide treatment, direct care services, preventive education programs and advocacy for individuals impacted by HIV/AIDS.'

For designer Brad Ford's Dining by Design installation, The Hudson Company's Reclaimed Oak, Original Face was used to create a warm, natural and minimalist space.

All photos by Michael Paniccia, courtesy of DIFFA.

To learn more about DIFFA, visit their website www.diffa.org.

Setting The Stage: The Hudson Company + Field & Supply 2016

In designing the stage, I was inspired by artist Donald Judd. I wanted to create a simple form that complimented the materials (White Oak) but didn’t distract from the natural surroundings.
— Designer Brad Ford
Donald Judd, Untitled sketch, 1967, Graphite on paper. (C) Judd Foundation.

Donald Judd, Untitled sketch, 1967, Graphite on paper. (C) Judd Foundation.

Donald Judd, Untitled Works in Concrete: Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas,   1984.

Donald Judd, Untitled Works in Concrete: Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, 1984.

Finished Field + Supply stage, designed by Brad Ford and built with Hudson Company White Oak planking.

Finished Field + Supply stage, designed by Brad Ford and built with Hudson Company White Oak planking.

Setting The Stage at Field + Supply 2016

This October, The Hudson Company was proud to be a partner of Field + Supply, an event led by New York based designer Brad Ford. Over the past three years, this multi-day experience has grown to include bespoke furniture, ceramics, and textiles. And for this year's Field + Supply event, The Hudson Company partnered with Brad Ford to create a temporary stage for the weekend's lineup of musical performances.

Inspiration and Construction

According to Ford, the inspiration for the event's all wood stage actually came from sculptor Donald Judd, well known for his work in concrete, "In designing the stage, I was inspired by artist Donald Judd. I wanted to create a simple form that complimented the materials (White Oak) but didn't distract from the natural surroundings." Andrew Phillips of The Hudson Company points out that, "from a builder's perspective, Brad's design is extremely clean, uncluttered in detail, and understated. Simplicity in design is easy to conceptualize but always more difficult to execute."

When it came time to bring Ford’s design to life, the stage's structure was first built on site at The Hudson Company in Pine Plains, NY so that materials could be custom cut and fit to the stage's exact dimensions. Because the stage was going to be a relatively large, temporary structure, it had to be easy to build, assemble and dismantle in a short time. The stage's design called for The Hudson Company’s Center Cut White Oak to 'wrap' the stage surfaces completely, thus creating the solid mass that inspired Ford. Once the stage had been mocked up in Pine Plains and the cladding cut to fit, it was then disassembled, transported, and reassembled at the Field + Supply event site, Hasbrouk House in Stoneridge, NY.

A Quiet But IMpactful Statement

Looking back on the 2016 Field + Supply event, Ford is overwhelmed with the overall experience, "This year's Field + Supply was by far my favorite. The lush, open setting was idyllic, the crisp fall weather was perfect, and I think we had the best group of vendors to date. But one of this year's highlights was definitely the live music with The Hudson Company's stage serving as the backdrop. I think the stage made a quiet but impactful statement, which is a philosophy I share and admire in The Hudson Company."

From the beginning, this one-of-a-kind stage was meant to be temporary, built solely for this year's Field + Supply event. But, in fact, it looks like our little stage will live on and be used for future events at the Hasbrouck House.

Learn more about Hudson Company Center Cut White Oak wood surfaces.

Learn more about designer Brad Ford and Field & Supply.

The stage structure being mocked up at The Hudson Company Mill in Pine Plains, NY.

The stage structure being mocked up at The Hudson Company Mill in Pine Plains, NY.

Onsite stage build at Hasbrouk House, Stone Ridge, NY.

Onsite stage build at Hasbrouk House, Stone Ridge, NY.

From a builder’s point of view, Brad [Ford]’s design is extremely clean, uncluttered in detail, and understated. Simplicity in design is easy to conceptualize but always more difficult to pull-off.
— Andrew Phillips, The Hudson Company
Hudson Company Center Cut White Oak planking in detail.

Hudson Company Center Cut White Oak planking in detail.

The finished stage in action during Field + Supply 2016.

The finished stage in action during Field + Supply 2016.

North 1st Street Profile Featuring The Hudson Company on Inhabit Blog

This week, the good people at Inhabit did an in-depth profile on our collaboration with The Corcoran Group for this stunning New York townhouse at North 1st Street. Read Alex Ronan's story outlining how this extraordinary, one of a kind property came to life. 

The Inhabit story is here. More information about our Reclaimed Heart Pine floors is here.

Installation in Focus: Private Residence, Brooklyn, NY

All photos by  Evan Joseph . Used with kind permission.

All photos by Evan Joseph. Used with kind permission.

Reclaimed Heart Pine for a Bespoke Brooklyn home

This year, The Hudson Company was proud to provide 2,000 square feet of ¾” x 7” Reclaimed Heart Pine [New Face] and 1,600 square feet of ¾” x 4” x 24” Reclaimed Heart Pine Herringbone [New Face] to this stunning Brooklyn townhouse project. This source material for this project was reclaimed from the New York City area (some of which was salvaged from a nearby Domino Sugar factory that had recently been decommissioned). All of the reclaimed wood flooring was site finished.

A well-crafted labor of love

According to Jeff Lorenz, one of the project's principals, the use of natural-tone woods was a central design goal, 'We set out to create a very natural, warm feeling home. We used a lot of wood between our floors and extensive millwork package. With both, we tried to showcase the materials natural beauty by keeping stains and finishes to an absolute minimum.' Unlike a typical 'owner-driven' design program, this residential development, designed by architect Will Corcoran, was built in anticipation of a future tenant. 'This home was a true labor of love,' says Lorenz, 'we set out to build our dream home in the hopes that the end user would appreciate the extensive material sourcing and craftsmanship.'

From the very beginning, sustainable material sourcing was important to the project. 'We are located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn,' explains Lorenz, 'and one of the neighborhoods most iconic buildings is the Domino Sugar factory. When we learned that we could incorporate material salvaged from such an historic place we knew we had to do it. People's reaction to this part of the project has been truly remarkable.'

A Successful Partnership, An Impressive Result

When all was said and done, the finished home was a profound success - the result of the dedication of numerous creative teams and craftspeople; from the design to the intricate tile and iron work to the beautiful Henrybuilt cabinetry. According to Lorenz, a successful collaboration with The Hudson Company was also a central part of what helped bring the project together, 'Working with Hudson was a great experience; when we came up a bit short of flooring material, they turned around what we needed in no time. When we decided we wanted to make a special 1" x 1" baseboard out of the same flooring material, The Hudson Company milled it down, no problems.'

Now that the project is finished, the only question that we have is, 'when can we move in?'

You can learn more about Reclaimed Heart Pine here or get a quote for your next project hereAll photos by Evan Joseph, used with kind permission.

All photos by  Evan Joseph . Used with kind permission.

All photos by Evan Joseph. Used with kind permission.

Inspired By: Sustainable Development at 60 White Street, New York

Watch Giglio on White, a short film documenting the redevelopment of 60 White Street in New York.  

With this project, we are preserving history and the environment. We’re setting an example of the power that we all hold in deciding how to live.
— Veronica Mainetti
The historic floor joists inside 60 White Street.

The historic floor joists inside 60 White Street.

An Ambitious resurrection in Tribeca

Developer Veronica Mainetti of Sorgente Group of America has big dreams for the property her team is reclaiming at 60 White Street in TriBeCa.

"After unveiling these gorgeous buildings from all of the years of use and abuse," Mainetti says, "I find myself breathing with it for the first time. All of the rooms are emptied, revealing the incredible structure that it houses. This is the point of rebirth. This is where the bond really begins between the building and me. It is as if the energy is finally awakening for the first time in decades and one can truly feel the soul of these beauties."

As a fifth-generation member of the Mainetti family, Veronica Mainetti was named President of the Sorgente Group of America in 2004 and, under her stewardship, Sorgente continues to expand its US portfolio with key acquisitions in California and New York, where most of their landmark properties are located, including the iconic Flatiron Building.

With 60 White Street, Mainetti's passion is deeply personal, "The unique opportunity to preserve a piece of history is extremely rewarding and humbling for me, it is what I love most about my job. Bringing back these facades to their original state from 1869 will be an absolute honor."

Sustainable Materials, sustainable Rebirth

At 147-years-old, the cast-iron building at 60 White Street is looking better than ever thanks to a painstaking three-year, sustainable restoration. The eight-unit condo conversion reused a whopping 80% of materials salvaged from the original structure and is kitted out with the latest passive house technologies (including a brand new class of window developed specifically by Zola for the project), as well as a blue roof rainwater collection system, an air-purifying green wall in the lobby, and radiant heat throughout the residences for comfort and energy-efficiency.

“Everything from day one has been about having this building perform in a smarter way,” explains Mainetti in the trailer for a documentary she produced to chronicle 60 White’s restoration. “Passive house windows set a new energy standard with modern technology. What doesn’t come from the existing structure is locally sourced.”

In addition to its impressive material reuse rate, the building was designed with a highly insulated envelope to keep energy usage to a minimum. European window company Zola developed a new class of 3-paned, passive house-certified windows for the project that keep drafts and noise out while staying true to the structure’s 1869 facade. The sumptuous marble that lines the bathrooms, kitchens and common areas was sourced locally at Vermont Danby Marble. 

For the 60 White Street project, The Hudson Company has provided 18,000 square feet of high quality, high character Reclaimed Oak [Engineered, New Face]. Before being incorporated in the the 60 White Street project, this reclaimed wood material was redirected out of the waste stream and then custom milled at our FSC-certified mill in Pine Plains, New York. The rugged, natural textures of this Reclaimed Oak provide a rich complement to 60 White Street's salvaged brick walls, creating a warm and distinctive interior materials palette.

“The challenge is the convince others what a sustainable future really is,” says Mainetti. “With this project, we are preserving history and the environment. We’re setting an example of the power that we all hold in deciding how to live.”

Learn more about Hudson Company Reclaimed Flooring here and explore more about the 60 White Street development here.

Detail exterior shot at historic 60 White Street. 

Detail exterior shot at historic 60 White Street. 

Developer Veronica Mainetti of Sorgente Group of America at The Hudson Company Mill.

Developer Veronica Mainetti of Sorgente Group of America at The Hudson Company Mill.

Detail from the historic facade at 60 White Street.

Detail from the historic facade at 60 White Street.

*Some of the above editorial content has been sourced and repurposed from www.60white.com. All photos are still images taken from the film Giglio on White, copyright Sorgente Group of America and Two Penguins.