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Ridgefield Showroom Profile In Architectural Digest

Profile Excerpt from Architectural Digest, Dec 13, 2018

“When Jamie Hammel bought what was then known as Antique and Vintage Woods of America eight years ago, he recalls, "I thought the product was beautiful, but it wasn't being presented beautifully." Fast forward nearly a decade and Hammel is operating what is now The Hudson Company, providing new and salvaged wood surfaces to architects and designers for projects (including, most notably, Renzo Piano's Whitney Museum) in the New York area and beyond. And his latest showroom is proof that beautiful presentation is core to the brand.

The Hudson Company's third location is in a woodsy area of Ridgefield, Connecticut. "So many of our clients co-locate between the city and a house upstate or in Connecticut or the Hamptons," Hammel explains of the choice. "We have the mill, in Pine Plains, so that helps us cover that territory, but we didn't really have a presence in Connecticut. Ridgefield is a beautiful town and is not in the heart of Greenwich." He clarifies: "Being on Greenwich Avenue would feel just like our Manhattan showroom. This is a little bit off the beaten path, but it's central to both Westchester and Connecticut."“

Read The Full Article and Go Behind The Scenes

Click here to read the full article in Architectural Digest, featuring interviews with The Hudson Company’s Jamie Hammel and designer Brad ford. Story by Hadley Keller, photos by Michael Biondo.

The Hudson Company In The Wall Street Journal

From the  Wall Street Journal  homepage, Dec 17. Project photos by    François Coquerel    for the  Wall Street Journal.  Click the image to read the full profile.

From the Wall Street Journal homepage, Dec 17. Project photos by François Coquerel for the Wall Street Journal. Click the image to read the full profile.

A Modern NY Farmhouse Designed by Architect Tom Kundig

We are thrilled to see our recent work for the Millerton, NY home of Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky, designed by Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects, featured in the Wall Street Journal this week.

Read the profile article by Sarah Medford online here.

Project and Press Details

- Project Location:  Millerton, NY

- Architect: Olson Kundig

- Contractor: United Construction

- WSJ Magazine story by Sarah Medford

- Photographer:  François Coquerel

- Featured Hudson Company Materials:  Reclaimed Barn Siding and Reclaimed Oak flooring.

— More photos and project details to come.

Hudson Company Product Installations

To see more commercial, residential, and cultural design installations featuring Hudson Company wood products, visit our online installation gallery.

Introducing The Hudson Company Journal, Vol 2

Introducing the All New Hudson Company Journal, Volume 2

The new issue of The Hudson Company Journal  celebrates the people, products, and projects at the heart of who we are, goes behind the scenes at our mill in upstate New York, and takes an in-depth look at the best of our design installations, including our floors for the new Whitney Museum of American Art.

The Hudson Company Journal, Vol 2 is a tool to help designers and homeowners envision ways to use custom wood flooring, paneling and beams in your next design project.

Stop by our ManhattanBrooklyn, or Pine Plains Showroom to pick up your copy of The Hudson Company Journal Volume 2.

 

*Read A Digital Version of The Journal Here*

The Hudson Co. Featured on Architizer.com

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The Hudson Company on Architizer.com

Thanks to Sydney Franklin and the entire team at Architizer.com for featuring us on their site this month. Their profile of The Hudson Company - Good Wood: The Epic Journey of Reclaimed Timber Flooring is a fantastic overview of the people, products, and process that make The Hudson Company who we are.

Here's an excerpt:

"With a few exceptions, no single architectural project is entirely made of building-products sourced from the same place. It takes a village of manufacturers — all working in conjunction with architects, engineers and contractors — to compose a proper shelter for us to inhabit. Everything from the exterior cladding and the roof to the window hinges and the kitchen countertops are hand-selected from around the world and chosen for their performance and aesthetic quality. The same goes for something as seemingly simple as flooring: As an interior structural element that heavily contributes to the experiential qualities of a space, it’s imperative that architects choose the most appropriate material to go beneath our feet.

This is where wood comes in. We all know what bad wood flooring looks like, but truly great wood flooring is an instant turn-on. It’s sexy. It’s clean. It has a level of depth and texture that fake wood flooring, ceramic tiles and even concrete can’t inherently produce. It’s all-natural and cuts to our core. Each individual plank features a distinct pattern and porosity that can’t be precisely reproduced in the plank next to it."

Read the full story here. 

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The Hudson Company Featured at AndNorth.com

Photos by  Kyle Dorosz  for www.andnorth.com. Read  And North's  full profile on The Hudson Company  here. 

Photos by Kyle Dorosz for www.andnorth.com. Read And North's full profile on The Hudson Company here. 

We are thrilled to be featured on the outstanding And North website this month! Thanks to author Nikki Ridgway for the thoughtful profile and to Kyle Dorosz for the stunning photos. Below is an excerpt from the story, but go ahead and visit andnorth.com to read the full story.

Before The Hudson Company was a supplier of reclaimed wood flooring for the east coast’s top designers and architects, it was Antique and Vintage Woods of America, a company founded in 1995 by a retired math teacher in Kent, Connecticut. By 2009, the company was crafting wood floorboards and paneling from old barns, mills, and bowling alleys for local homes and businesses, but hadn’t quite tapped into New York’s design and architecture communities where there seemed to be a growing trend in using reclaimed wood for commercial and interior design projects...
[Today] The company has grown from eight employees to a team of 25 specialists in carpentry, woodwork, and design, all of whom are involved in the reclamation process, including sourcing the wood from old barn siding, disused Manhattan water towers, and 19th-century industrial structures across New York State and beyond. “From barn to factory, we handle the denailing, re-sawing, grading, kiln drying, molding, and more right here,” says Jamie Hammel, “we’re a manufacturing company in the state of New York, and that’s not easy, but we’re trying to create a company where people want to spend their whole careers.”

Read And North's full profile on The Hudson Company here.